Alcohol, drugs, gambling or something else? Do the costs now outweigh the benefits? Is it time to stop addiction?

No matter what type, it is nearly impossible to stop addiction on one’s own. Friends and family will try to help, but they lack the skills and commitment necessary to make permanent changes a reality. When an addictive behavior is affecting the way a person lives, whether it be a break down in their personal relationships or their career, it is time to take control again and stop addiction in its tracks.our_philosophy_photo

At Practical Recovery, we focus on the entire person, not just their addictive behavior. Responding to every concern at the same time in an integrated manner is the most successful path to change. Our highly trained clinicians predominantly have doctoral degrees. They respond to human complexity in an effort to stop addiction from taking over a person’s life.

We Create a Unique Set of Services for Each Individual, Rather Than Making Each Person Fit Into a Pre-existing Treatment Plan or “Program.”

Other facilities expect a client to fit into the programs that they offer. At Practical Recovery our clients just need to show up. We take it from there, working in collaboration with every person and anyone else who needs to be involved (typically a partner or parents). Collectively we decide what happens in treatment, including scheduling, which therapists and other providers our clients work with, whether they choose to attend groups, or work privately. Research is clear that collaboration results in better outcomes, and we couldn’t agree more.

Our core service is  based on individual sessions so that each client receives the time and attention they need to help them stop addiction and go on to live richer, fuller lives. Nevertheless, treatment is not typically a “quick fix.” The recovery process tends to be longer and more involved than one would expect. Fortunately, the rewards received after one has learned how to stop addiction are great (many times life-changing) and worth the effort.

Welcome to Practical Recovery.